Mountain lion euthanized in Kentucky

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife stands by its decision to euthanize a mountain lion found in Bourbon County.

Erin McClure found out from a neighbor that a homeowner walking her dog discovered the mountain lion right past her property, where her children like to run around.

“Less than a quarter mile and my kids are playing in front of this animal yesterday so it’s pretty scary,” said McClure.

News of Fish and Wildlife officers euthanizing the animal instead of tranquilizing it cause an uproar on social media. But according to Fish and Wildlife the concern was public safety.

“It was almost dark, nightfall. It would have left very likely we may not have located it again for some time so it was a safety concern,” said Steve Dobey with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Except for a mountain lion cub sighting in the late 90’s, this is the first time they’ve had proof of the animal in Kentucky.

When it comes to debating the perfect solution, all Erin McClure has to do is think of her children.

“I’m glad they took care of it. Maybe not in the way everybody thinks it should’ve been done but they did what they thought was best I appreciate that,” said McClure.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife still doesn’t know if the mountain lion was living in the wild or whether someone owned it.

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