Studies: Illinois’ fixed-tuition law drives up others’ costs

Researchers say an Illinois law that locks in tuition rates for in-state students appears to have the unintended effect of driving up tuition for out-of-state students and fees for all.
    
The law, which took effect in 2004, guarantees that a student starting as a freshman at a state university will pay the same tuition rate for four years.
    
Only three other states have similar laws, Oklahoma, Texas and North Carolina.
    
A recent study and another published last year show that tuition and fees started to rise much faster for non-resident students at Illinois state schools when the law took effect.
    
University of Illinois spokesman Tom Hardy says the school would like to see the law repealed.

Related Articles

Judge strikes down Kentucky Internet restrictions for sex offenders A federal judge has struck down Kentucky's restrictions on Internet access for registered sex offenders, saying they are too broad and violate First A...
#MeToo empowering local women to share stories, fight for change Advocates say the movement has millions of women finally feeling safe to come forward with stories of sexual assault and harassment.
Neighbors want safety measures at dangerous railroad crossing A blind railroad crossing on Matt Rich Road off Highway 62 has people demanding someone take responsibility.
Neighbors react to shooting suspect’s arrest People near Magruder Road in McCracken County, Kentucky, are sleeping a bit easier one day after Spencer Forrest’s arrest.