Video reveals police testimony on Gabriel Parker’s mindset

MARSHALL COUNTY, KY — We’re getting a glimpse of what investigators say was the mindset of the now 16 year old accused in the Marshall County High School shooting.

A detective described Gabriel Parker as “cold and callous” when he interviewed Parker after his arrest.

Video from the hearing that took place just two days after the shooting has now been released to the public. In it you can see Parker sitting next to officers of the court with a black shirt on.  He shows no emotion and only answers direct questions from the judge.

Here’s what we learned after looking at court hearing video from Jan. 25.  The investigating captain with the Marshall County Sheriff’s Office, Matt Hilbrecht, testified that Parker told him he’d thought about the shooting for about a week leading up to the incident, but only decided to carry it out the night before. Also, the gun used was a Ruger 9mm pistol, which he got from his house and belonged to his stepfather.

During his testimony, Hilbrecht described Parker’s demeanor during the first interrogation as  “cold, callous.”

“He never was emotional. His voice never quivered, never had any inflection, (didn’t) tear up,” Hilbrecht said. “We showed him a photo of one of the deceased…said ‘I don’t know her’. Had no response.”

Hilbrecht also testified that Parker took the gun, two magazines and a hunting knife he’d gotten for Christmas to the school that day. As to why Parker brought a knife with him, the captain testified: “He said that he feared that when he ran out of bullets, that the children might attack him, and he needed a way to defend himself.”

We’re also hearing from the judge who first presided over this case, District Court Judge Jack Telle. He talked about the emotional nature of this case to people inside the courtroom.

“I am mindful that this is an extraordinarily difficult time in the life of our community, that there are many issues. There are many unanswered questions,” Telle said. “There may be many questions that might not ever be answered. However, this process involves the due process of any individual who has been charged with violation of the law in our society, our state, our nation is entitled to.”

Local 6 is reviewing roughly three hours of testimony and court proceedings from the juvenile hearing. In one exchange Assistant County Attorney Jason Darnall asked KSP Detective David Dick if Parker knew the possible harm he could cause and if Parker stated a motivation for the shooting.

Darnall asked: “Did you ask him specifically if he realized shooting into a group of people, there would be a likelihood of death or serious injury?” David answered: “Yes sir. He was aware of the consequences as we spoke about that at length, as well.”

“Did you ask him if there’s been any issues at school that may have motivated this?” Darnall asked.

“Yes sir,” Dick replied. “He didn’t mention any kind of experience with any form of bullying, any arguments, any negative interactions that we could aim at focusing this, his actions.”

Hilbrecht also testified that Parker said he considered the pros and cons of the shooting, how people would react, and the possibility he would spend his life in prison. “Yes, he did say that he did weigh that out. He had contemplated other things, you know, harming himself, the results that would have on his family, the results this would have on his family,” the He talked specifically about wondering what prison life would be like. Part of the reason he may have committed it was wanting to find out truly what prison life was like.”

Detective Matt Wise, who watched surveillance video of Parker as he walked into the commons area and began firing, testified: “I was able to view that and slow that down, and you can see the muzzle flash. You can count muzzle flashes, and you can see Mr. Parker clearly.”

“In that video do you see students fleeing?” Darnall asked.

“Yes sir. In every direction,” Wise said.

Parker faces two counts of murder and 14 counts of assault in the mass shooting.

The Kentucky Court of Appeals ordered Judge Jamie Jameson to release the video, along with video of Parker’s arraignment in circuit court and hundreds of pages of documents relating to the case. This, after Paxton Media Group filed two petitions on behalf of three news outlets requesting Jameson unseal public documents and open court proceedings to the public.

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