Teen tech trends

Tools

Reporter - Marissa Hollowed
Web Editor - Ryan Burkett

According to the teens at Union City High School, the Facebook feed is old news.

"My parents have Facebook," said student Aranda Tate. "It's bad to say, but once your parents and family start getting the social network you have, it's time to switch."

Even Facebook is recognizing this. Here's an excerpt from its annual 10K report. It reads:

"We believe that some of our users, particularly our younger users, are aware of and actively engaging with other products and services similar to, or as a substitute for, Facebook."

But these kids haven't ditched the social network yet. They stay on it to update older family members.

"Instead of having to repeat everything I'm doing, I just put it on Facebook, so they can check it," Tate said.

For the millennial generation - those born in the 80s and after - Facebook is moving out and so is using an actual computer. Now it's all about the apps on your smartphone.

Here is how some of those apps work: on Twitter, for example, you can post a status or a picture. All you have to do is take the snapshot and upload it in a matter of seconds.

Twitter's appeal? It updates every minute, so it's more stuff coming in you can look at.

If checking your Twitter feed multiple times per day isn't enough, there's Instagram. It's an app where you can snap a picture, soup it up with fancy filters and share.

Pinterest is popular with the girls during prom season as they share everything from hairstyles to fashion.

Some brand new apps take it easy on our attention span. One is Snapchat, where you take a picture. From there, you can add a caption, draw on it and send it to your friends. The photo only lasts for 10 seconds on the recipient's phone.

Another boredom buster: Vine. It's a video sharing app that allows to take and edit a six-second video.
New things will continue to arise and we'll keep jumping on, but sticking with the new apps is the problem. If you're not up to par on technological issues, you could just get left behind.

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