Earthquake shakes, stirs up questions

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Reporter - Jason Hibbs
Photojournalist - Chad Darnall

BALLARD, Ky.---A few seconds of strange sounds and shaking; many of you experienced that during yesterday's earthquake near LaCenter, Kentucky.

Some may wonder if the tremor could trigger more earthquakes.  Luckily, the earthquake doesn't mean much. The geologist points out this was a 2.6 magnitude quake. They usually have to be 2.5 magnitude or more to even be felt and larger than that to trigger aftershocks, generally above a 5.

It turns out this earthquake is one of many this size along the New Madrid Seismic Zone in the last 25 years, but the people who felt it are still shaken.

Inside Bluegrass Grill in LaCenter, Kentucky, Max Loe serves the usual; a warm meal, hot coffee, and good conversation.

Today's topic is different.

The 2.6 magnitude earthquake has shaken the tiny town and stirred up questions.

Murray State Geologist George Kipphut said people should prepare for an earthquake, but not worry.

"A small earthquake in LaCenter does not necessarily mean a large earthquake is going to follow soon," Kipphut said.

Back at Bluegrass, Loe sorts silverware as her customers sift through their stories.

everyone has accepted the fact, it'll happen again. the only question is when.

A spokesperson with The U.S. Geological Survey said they will not be sending a team to the LaCenter area because this event wasn't large enough.

He said if there were multiple small quakes, then they would consider sending a follow up team.

The geologist said individual and family preparedness can go a long way. use this as an opportunity to prepare for all types of natural disasters.

For some helpful disaster preparedness tools from the Kentucky Emergency Management Agency, click here.   

The earthquake also gained the attention of students inside a Paducah Tilghman science class.

Teacher Nancy Broyles tells us her students paid extra attention today as they looked at the seismograph, and learned more about what earthquakes can do.

Broyles let her students know earthquakes of this magnitude are common along the new Madrid seismic zone.

For more information about how to prepare yourself for earthquakes, click here.

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