President Obama signs Freedom to Fish Act

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Web Editor - Ryan Burkett

WASHINGTON, D.C. - President Barack Obama has signed the Freedom to Fish Act into law.

The bill implements a two-year moratorium on a plan to restrict fishing access along the Cumberland River.

The Army Corps of Engineers had planned to place barricades along the Barkley and Wolf Creek Dams, restricting fishing access to the dams' tailwaters.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, who sponsored the bill, commended the president for signing the legislation.

“I appreciate the President signing the legislation into law and reversing the Administration’s decision to place barriers and restrict fishing along the Cumberland River,” McConnell said. “No one I know in Kentucky supported this plan—not fishermen and boaters, not local elected officials, and not the Kentucky Division of Fish and Wildlife."

Monday was the last day for Obama to sign or veto the bill, which passed the House on May 16 and the Senate on May 21.

Earlier story:

WASHINGTON, D.C. - A White House official tells CNN's Lisa Desjardins that President Barack Obama will sign the Freedom to Fish Act into law on Monday.

The bill implements a two-year moratorium on a plan to restrict fishing access along the Cumberland River.

The Army Corps of Engineers had planned to place barricades along the Barkley and Wolf Creek Dams, restricting fishing access to the dams' tailwaters.

The House passed the bill to halt that plan on May 16 and the Senate followed on May 21. Monday is the last day for President Obama to sign or veto the bill.

While the Freedom to Fish Act puts a stop to the Corps' plan temporarily, the Water Resources Development Act would place a permanent moratorium on the placement of barricades. That bill has passed the Senate, but the House of Representatives has yet to vote on it.

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