Kentucky road crews repair equipment for more snow - WPSD Local 6: Your news, weather, and sports authority

Kentucky road crews repair equipment for more snow

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McCRACKEN Co, Ky -

Kentucky Highway crews are getting their trucks loaded and equipment ready for possible winter weather this weekend.

They were going to spend Friday getting the roads pre-treated, but decided there was enough residue of salt from previous treatment left on the roads. Now, road workers' priority is making repairs to the equipment damaged in recent storms.

Highway crews already know they won't be spending much time with their families this weekend.

"You try and spend as much time with your family as you can, but it's part of the job and something we have to do," said Mark Scheer, superintendent at the Livingston County state garage.

Scheer has worked on highways in Livingston County for 25 years and knows the chance of snow means work.

"To be sure you've got plenty of salt, plenty of plow blades, your equipment's going," Scheer said.

Across the state, highway workers are using the break between snow storms to get equipment up and running and in good condition. Keith Todd with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says recent snow storms have been hard on the equipment.

"There's always something that needs to be repaired or replaced, plow blades that need to be replaced, things like that," Todd said.

On top of that, crews have to have the salt ready to roll out.

Salt storage bins in the area may look low now, but trucks are loaded and ready to go, and 11,000 more tons of salt are on their way into the area right now.

As of yesterday, District 1 road crews had 75,000 tons of salt on hand. With more than 11,000 more tons, Todd's not worried about a shortage.

"At this point, we're watching inventories, and we'll hopefully get a break," Todd said.

Workers like Scheer won't be getting a break.

"Pretty much it's going to take up our entire weekend," Scheer said.

They're putting in the hours to keep your roads safe.

Todd says crews usually go through 200,000 to 250,000 tons of salt per year. Todd says more accidents start happening on highways after the third snow event, because drivers get overly confident driving in the snow. He advises everyone to slow down.

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