School districts work to manage snow days - WPSD Local 6: Your news, weather, and sports authority

School districts work to manage snow days

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MARSHALL CO, Ky -

Many students in the Local 6 area spent their Monday outside the classroom on their sleds, with more snow days piling up in the calendar.

"It gives the kids a break and chance to play in the snow," said Amanda Keeling, who has a seventh-grader in the Marshall County School District in Kentucky.

While it's fun for some, schools districts are finding different ways to stop snow days from impacting your child's education.

Keeling and Ben Basham couldn't be happier to be spending the extra time with their kids.

"Gets them away from their video games and their internet," Keeling said.

Ledonia Williamson with Marshall County Schools puts a lot of time into the academic calendar planning for snow days. She adds seven extra days into the calendar and 13 make-up days in case they need them to stay on track.

"Our students were supposed to be out May 20 as their last day, and May 20 is still their last day," Williamson said.

Other school districts are taking a different approach to end on time. A large county with a lot of rural roads, Livingston County School District has the most snow days in our area, with about 10 in the average year.

"It can snow on one part of the county and not on the other and keep us out of school for the day" said Sheri Henson, the district's instructional supervisor.

This is the first year Livingston County has had a waiver from the state that allows children to do lessons from home online or through packets. Henson says for the first time in a long time the semester is on track to end on time.

"We're going to continue looking at feedback, but I think they've been beneficial at this point," Henson said.

Graves County also has the waiver to allow students to learn from home through what the state calls non-traditional instruction days. Other districts looking into the idea of non-traditional instruction days include Crittenden County, Calloway County and McCracken County. Williamson said Marshall County schools won't apply for the waiver until they know every student has access to the internet.

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