I Am Local 6: Social media brings women together after 33 years

Three women have social media to thank for bringing them together to remember their loved ones.

"I think it is down here on the left," said Ellen Powless to her sister Carla Jetton.

The drive for Ellen and Carla was one they felt destined to take.

On the porch of her home, Tammy Clement was waiting. "We know when we see something slow down it’s them," said Tammy as she looked out at the road.

The sisters were returning something that never belonged to them, and the owner has never seen it either. "I think the timing is perfect," said Ellen.

That timing is the three months since Tammy’s son, Jason, passed away, and the five years since Ellen and Carla’s mother died. Those timelines are brought together by a keepsake called a patty cake. It is a bronzed handprint and footprint of Tammy’s daughter Katie that was made in 1984. The meeting is the first time Tammy got to see it.

Ellen and Carla’s mother made patty cakes as her business. Five years since their mother’s death, the sisters were finally going through some of her boxes and found a patty cake. The order form had Tammy’s name on it.

Tammy never got it because she moved, and Ellen and Carla’s mom could not find her address.

Ellen and Carla knew they needed to give the keepsakes to Tammy. They turned to Facebook to try to find her. Within an hour, they found each other.

Thirty-three years after the imprints were made, the sisters sat on Tammy’s porch and gave her the keepsake. "Look at those little feet!" Tammy said.

"If our mother held on to these for 33 years, it must’ve been very important to her," said Ellen.

Because of Facebook, these women, who were strangers mere minutes before, are able to grieve and heal together.

"That old saying that you’re not supposed to bury your children, they’re supposed to bury you? It’s true," said Tammy.

I asked Carla how she felt after meeting Tammy. "It’s a feeling of completeness, carrying out one last thing that our mother left behind and being able to close another chapter," Carla said.

The three women are realizing the power of social media and its ability to connect us all.

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